Wicca, Witchcraft and Paganism, for the Novice to the Crone

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One traditional Yuletide practice is the creation of a Yule tree. This can be a living, potted tree which can later be planter in the ground or a cut one. The choice is yours.

Appropriate Pagan decorations are fun to make, from strings of dried rosebuds and cinnamon sticks (or popcorn and cranberries) for garlands, to bags of fragrant spices which are hung from boughs. Quartz crystals can be wrapped with shiny wire and suspended from sturdy branches to resemble icicles. Apples, oranges and lemons hanging from boughs are strikingly beautiful, natural decorations, and were customary in ancient times.


Many enjoy the custom of lighting the Yule log. This is a graphic representation of the rebirth of the God within the sacred fire of the Mother Goddess. If you choose to burn one, select a proper log (traditionally of oak or pine). Carve or chalk a figure of the Sun (such as a rayed disc) or the God (a horned circle or a figure of a man) upon it, with the Boline, and set it alight in the fireplace at dusk on Yule. As the log burns, visualize the Sun shining within it and think of the coming warmer days.


As to food, nuts, fruits such as apples and pears, cakes of caraways soaked in cider, and (for non-vegetarians) pork are traditional fare. Wassail, lamb’s wool, hibiscus or ginger tea and fine drinks for the Simple Feast or Yule Meals.

More Yule Lore

More Folklore and Lore of Yule

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