Wicca, Witchcraft and Paganism, for the Novice to the Crone

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At Beltane, spring is getting seriously underway. Gardens everywhere will be planted, sprouts will begin to appear, and the earth will be returning to life once again. This time of year is associated with fertility, thanks to the greening of the land, and with fire. A few Spring related herbs can be blended together to make the perfect Beltane incense. Burn this incense during Wiccan rituals on Beltane (April 30th) or on May Day for fortune and favors and to attune with the changing of the seasons.


Fresh herbs will likely be too young to harvest right now, which is why it's a good idea to keep a supply on hand from the previous year. However, if you do have a fresh plant you wish to dry out, you can do this by placing it on a tray in your oven at low heat for an hour or two. If you have a home dehydrator, these work just as well.


This recipe is for loose incense, but you can adapt it for stick or cone recipes. If you haven't read up on Incense 101, you should do that before beginning. As you mix and blend your incense, focus on the goal of your work.


You’ll need:



Add your ingredients to your mixing bowl one at a time. Measure carefully, and if the leaves or blossoms need to be crushed, use your mortar and pestle to do so. As you blend the herbs together, state your intent. You may find it helpful to charge your incense with an incantation, such as:


Fire blend and fire light,

I celebrate Beltane this warm spring night.

This is the time of most fertile earth,

the greening of the land, and new rebirth.

Fire and passion and labor's toil,

life grows anew out of the soil.

By Beltane's flames, bring fertility to me,

As I will, so it shall be.


Store your incense in a tightly sealed jar. Make sure you label it with its intent and name, as well as the date you created it. Use within three months, so that it remains charged and fresh.


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This Wiccan “How To,” plus much more, can be found in:


The Complete Book of Incense, Oils and Brews by Scott Cunningham

One of the secrets of real magic is that it is controlled by the mind. The more things in your ritual to help your mind associate with your goal, the more powerful your ritual may be. Colored candles, scented oils, natural incenses, and more all add to the impact of the magic you wish to do. But how do you know which incense to burn? Is it possible to add scented oils together to get a more powerful oil? And how do you make your own appropriately-scented tools?

The answers to questions like these and hundreds more can be found in The Complete Book of Incense, Oils and Brews by world-famous author Scott Cunningham. This is a greatly expanded and rewritten version of The Magic of Incenses, Oils and Brews. It includes over 100 new formulas, proportions for each element of the recipes (the most requested feature from his previous book), how to substitute ingredients, and much more. Besides the formulas, it also includes the exact methods of making all of these scented tools, including how to extract the essences from the herbs.

Each one of the formulas in this magic book is precise and easy to make.  Also included are other ways to use magical powders that will have you coming up with your own ideas for them, too.

There is a legion of recipes for incenses. There are three for the sun and two for consecrating talismans. There are incenses for each of the astrological signs and ones to help you study better and gain success. You'll also find incenses for each of the planetary influences. There are four for Saturn alone!

This compendium of magical lore is a vital tool for every magical person on any magical path, whether you are a beginner or an expert.

Make your Own Beltane Incense

This Imbolc incense combines the scents of the season with the anticipation of warmer weather

Copyright © 1999 Scott Cunningham